Social Media

5 Ways to Use Influencer Marketing

The term ‘Influencer Marketing’ can mean different things to different people, and can sometimes be narrowly defined as one particular type of influence marketing. A brand might be constraining itself by only considering one type of influencer marketing, when others could be used to supplement it. Here’s a quick rundown of various methods of influencer marketing, from the least involved to most involved for influencers: 

Marketing From Influencers: Use Them for Trending Info

Whether you use simple tools like Twitter Lists, or something more thorough like Traackr, you can learn quite a bit from your influencers. What are industry experts predicting for the future, or what are the trends being talked about currently among influencers? Even without contacting influencers for input, you can gauge industry trends just by seeing what influencers are talking about and then adding to the conversation with your view. Not only will you find that your viewpoint will add to the natural conversation around the topic, but you’ll provide great SEO for others looking for more information about it.

Marketing Through Influencers: Give Them Exclusive Access

One key aspect of influencer marketing is making them feel appreciated, and part of that is offering them exclusive access to your events or influencers. At Ned Lamont for US Senate in 2006, our campaign communications team worked closely with political bloggers locally and nationally. We offered access to the candidate, and even issued press announcements and daily schedules to bloggers as well as mainstream media. By offering bloggers daily announcements and exclusive access, we helped create or inspire content.

Marketing To Influencers: Giving Them Free Stuff

When thinking about influencer marketing, most people think about free-stuff marketing. That is to say that a company will offer free services or products to influencers for review blogs, videos and social shares. Ford gave away 100 Fiestas in Europe in 2009 and in the US in 2013 to celebrities, bloggers and reviewers to increase awareness of the new vehicle. Influencers spent between six months and a year and produced tens-of-thousands of pieces of content. Some sources quoted a 60% market awareness of the vehicle before it was sold. (Disclosure: I am a member of the Ford press fleet program where I review vehicles for them, typically for a week.)    

Marketing With Influencers: Set Up a Social Influencer Program

A step beyond offering influencers exclusive access is to formalize a social influencer program. At BMC Software, our customer connect team uses an advocate hub to help customers interested in supporting BMC. Tools like Social Toaster and Addvocate help by offering pre-approved messages and social posts to influencers and employees to share on your behalf. With a  formalized tool, it’s much easier for influencers to share company and product information without fearing they are sharing unreleased information prematurely. 

Marketing Through Influencers: Guest Blogging

Perhaps the most time-intensive option in influencer marketing is guest blogging. Just like I’m writing this blog post for TaylorMade Solutions, your company can also recruit guest bloggers interested in sharing their perspective on the issues. They can help you create content and share the information with their audiences, while you can provide them an outlet and platform to reach new audiences.

Whether you’re just getting started in influencer marketing, or you have been working at it for years, it’s always a good idea to take a step back and see what other ways you might be able to improve or expand your program. While most people think of free-stuff or guest blogging as influencer marketing, there are many more options to engage and work with influencers for your mutual benefit.

Originally posted at TaylorMade Solutions: http://www.taylormadecanada.com/blog/entry.php?id=1294 

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How I Got My Social Media Job… Using Social Media

DearLisaLate in 2011, I had applied for the first Social Media Director position at The University of Michigan. I never got called back, but several months later while searching to see if the position had been filled, I happened upon DearLisaRudgers.com, another applicant’s custom designed website for the same position.

The Blog Post

I was so amazed, I contacted the applicant, Lindsay Blackwell, interviewed her and wrote this blog post: The Best Social Media Job Application EVER: How 22 Year-Old Lindsay Blackwell Applied for a $110K Job. It turns out that Lindsay didn’t get the job either, but she did get an amazing new job – but I digress.

A day later, I got these responses to the blog post on Twitter:

Rachel had read the blog post and wanted to know how to get the same type of enthusiasm for a Social Media opening that they had available. I applied for the position through LinkedIn on March 14, but was not contacted for an interview. I did, however, keep in contact with Rachel.

The YouTube Video

A few months later, they were looking to fill out the Social Media team with additional Social Media Managers. Rachel directed me to this tweet, where Joshua, the hiring manager, had posted a YouTube video to recruit for his opening. Great idea – introduce yourself, the company and give some flavor to the generally bland application process (the video has since been deleted, so the link wont work.)

We were able to speak that first weekend in June (who takes time away during the weekend to talk to a job applicant? An amazing boss, that’s who.) We had scheduled time to meet the next week on June 5, where I met with Joshua as the senior manager of content and creative, Joshua’s boss, the senior director of marketing programs, and the social media lead.

I Got The Job!

By the end of June, I had submitted writing samples for consideration, and in early July, had completed new hire paperwork. I submitted this creative writer’s resignation, complete with corporate marketing speak, along with my four-weeks notice (we were significantly understaffed in my last position.)

The first week of August, I started as the second social media manager at BMC Software, completing a process started with a blog post I had written nearly a half-year earlier.

Lessons Learned

Throughout the process, I learned a lot about the “professional courting process.” Here are some tips.

1. Blog – If I had never written the blog post, I may not ever have connected with Rachel. Not only does blogging get your thoughts out there, it’s a great way to network with people within your industry, or with similar interests.

2. Network – Connect with people that you meet both in person, as well as digitally. If I hadn’t kept up with Rachel, there’s no way she would’ve thought about me when the new social media openings were posted.

3. Be Patient – It took nearly a half-year from initially connecting, to hearing about the new position, interviewing, receiving the offer and starting to work.

Do you have any interesting stories or tips for social media job hunting? Share them in the comments below.

7 Things We Can Learn From 7 Social Media Influencers’ Tweets

You should dress for the job that you want, not the one you have. That adage probably applies to Twitter too – you should tweet like an influencer if you want to become one. So what do the top social media influencers tweet that we can learn? I’ve broken down the top words each of the top social media influencers use most frequently and have extrapolated some lessons.

Here are five things we can learn from top influencers:
(data from tweetstats.com, clouds from wordle.net) Continue reading

Why Companies Need Technology for Crowdsourcing Their Social Media Response

Guest post by Ashley Verrill.

I read a report recently that found 47 percent of people have used Facebook, Twitter and other social media channels for customer service. And these people aren’t just airing grievances. They actually expect a response. This presents a huge challenge for mega brands that receive thousands of mentions on any given week.

I’ve reviewed myriad technologies that enable companies to effectively filter out and respond to many of these mentions on social media. They use keyword identifiers to extract relevant messages and route them to a support rep or community manager to respond. While this does make the process more efficient, it can’t scale to meet the demand for some companies (without having to hire an army of responders). And what’s more, I would argue it’s more valuable in the marketing and building word-of-mouth context for people other than companies to get involved in these conversations.

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Synthesio Picks My Brain on Social Media Listening, ROI and the Super Bowl Blackout

Blog originally posted by Julie Meredith, Marketing Manager at Synthesio, at: http://synthesio.com/corporate/en/2013/marketing-2-0/eric-tungs-take-on-social-media-listening-roi-and-the-superbowlblackout/

This week we had the opportunity to chat with Eric T. Tung, Social Media Manager at BMC Software, and well-known social media blogger and speaker. Eric has over 30,000 personal connections in his network – he is one of the most followed people on Twitter in Houston.

We picked Eric’s brain about social media monitoring, the next big innovation he’d like to see, and his latest blog post – Best Marketing Responses to #SuperBowlBlackout

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Best Marketing Responses to #SuperBowlBlackout

Today, spending $4 million dollar on a 30-second ad can be quickly eclipsed by creating the right material at the right time – especially if people are briefly distracted from an event as big as the Super Bowl.

That’s exactly what happened this evening at the XLVII Super Bowl when a power outage cut out lights to half the stadium, knocked sideline systems offline and even muted commentators Jim Nantz and Phil Simms. Continue reading